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The Land Patent

 

 

What is a Land Patent?

 

What is color of Title?

  

The truth of the language will set you free!

 

 
 

    

     For a long time this nation "We the People" have believed that we are a free nation and have freedom of liberty and Justice for all. We have believed that we own our property and have certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That was true at one point in time but as time past we lost a lot of what we had through the change of language usage. Language usage created what is known as Color of Law. Our entire society today lives under Color of Law.


 

     For the information that I’m about to show you are with fact. For only the facts can be with the truth and only the truth can set you free. One must realize that if it is written it exist and if it is not written it’s only hear say. Now let’s look at what we had that our founding fathers gave us with truthful language usage. Then go forth and look at our society today with language usage on what we are. Then bring back the right our founding fathers gave us with truthful language usage. Follow the paper trail and see where it leads to you just might find a different concept in life.


 

     For the question, what is a Land Patent? A land patent is the first absolute title to land given by the United States of America to the bona fide purchaser or Homestead such titles are called "Allodial". When the public lands were sold, land "patents" were issued. The Land Patents are absolute title transferring land ownership from a sovereign (the United States of America Government) to a bona fide purchaser. Patents are the first records in a chain of title to a piece of the Public Domain. Therefore, they are extremely important in establishing private ownership of land. The United States of America acquired the land, by treaty or purchase nevertheless the acquired land had a treaty with the land in one form or another, and with any transaction of the land the treaty followed with it. When the territories where eligible for statehood, the condition for admission to the union was to surrender their land to the United States of America under an Enabling Act. The Enabling Act requires that all of the unappropriated (non-patented) lands be forever granted to the Union for its disposition. For example, here is an "irrevocable ordinance" from Michigan’s Enabling Act:


 

"Public lands of United States in Michigan."

 

"Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That nothing in this act contained, or in the admission of the said State into the Union as one of the United States of America upon an equal footing with the original States in all respects whatever, shall be so construed or understood as to confer upon the people, Legislature, or other authorities of the said State of Michigan, any authority or right to interfere with the sale by the United States, and under their authority, of the vacant and unsold lands within the limits of the said State, but that the subject of the public lands, and the interests which may be given to the said state therein, shall be regulated by future action between Congress, on the part of the United States, and the said State, or the authorities thereof. And the said State of Michigan shall in no case and under no pretense whatsoever, impose any tax, assessment or imposition of any description upon any of the lands of the United States within its limits."

Notice the language effect of these Enabling Acts in relation to state taxes and state statutes:

 

‘After exclusive jurisdiction over lands within a State have been ceded to the United States, private property located thereon is not subject to taxation by the State, nor can state statutes enacted subsequent to the transfer have any operation therein.’ Surplus Trading Company v. Cook, 281 U.S. 647; Western Union Telegraph Co. v. Chiles, 214 U.S. 274; Arlington Hotel v. Fant, 278 U.S. 439; Pacific Coast Dairy v. Department of Agriculture, 318 U.S. 285

 

     Without such transfer of control over the right and title to the land, there would be no effective authority in a land patent sealed under the signature of the President. The President signed the patents securing the patent rights to the patent holders and to their heirs and assigns forever.

 

     Before March 2, 1833; all original patents were actually signed by the President of the United States; after that, designated officials signed in his behalf. The earliest patent signed by a President is dated at Philadelphia, March 4, 1792, signed by President George Washington and countersigned by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson.

 

     There are many more cases where the United States Supreme Court has supported the fact that the Land Patent certifies absolute and supreme title to land. There are no cases where the courts ever ruled against the properly obtained Land Patent.

 

     For the case of Summa Corp. v California, 466 US 198, is not listed above, yet it is one of the best cases describing how land patents work. For the 1984 case the court noted that they had ruled and ruled and ruled and they were not going to rule again, the Land Patent is supreme title to land. The case was one where California was granted the tidewater lands in the California Republic Constitution and therefore California went after a family’s land, which land was secured under patent on an Old Spanish Land Grant. Interestingly, the case doesn’t talk much about land patents; it talks about the Guadeloupe Hidalgo Treaty. This land patent case speaks mostly about the supremacy clause of the Constitution, Article six paragraph two and with the support of paragraph three;

 

 

"This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding."

 

"The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States."

 

Follow the paper trail of language and learn the truth.

 

Public Land History

 

1776 The Declaration of Independence after the Revolutionary War sovereignty came to the land.


 

1783 Treaty of Paris was signed. This gave the United States over 270 million acres of lands East of the Mississippi, not including the original 13 colonies. These lands were to be used as payment for soldiers who had fought in the Revolutionary War.


 

1785 The Land Ordinance was created to handle the land growth. Public domain lands northwest of the Ohio River were to be surveyed into 36-square mile townships, and sold at no less than $1 per acre in tracts no smaller than 640 acres.

The Ordinance also reserved Section 16 of each township for the maintenance of schools; set aside lands for Continental Army bounties (changed in 1796); established the minimum price per acre; and minimum land quantity which could be bought.

The Ordinance further established that legal sale and settlement of the public land could not occur until the land had been surveyed and the survey accepted by the Federal Government.


 

1787 Sale of first public lands directed by Congress as soon as four of 'The Seven Ranges' in the Northwest Territory had been surveyed. At irregular, but well-advertised periods, at the office of the Board of Treasury in New York City, lands indicated on plats were offered for sale to highest bidders over the minimum price of $1 per acre.


 

1788 First patent issued to John Martin on March 4th for 640 acres in what is now Belmont County, Ohio.


 

1793 Eli Whitney's cotton gin helped in the settlement of the States of Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Louisiana and Arkansas.


 

1793-1823 Land size continued to grow and people moved west. Homesteaders, miners, and new towns began to take over lands they wanted surveyors trekked through unexplored territories to measure and describe what they saw.


 

1800 The Credit Act of May 10th authorized the sale of land for no less than $2 per acre and could be paid in four installments. The buyer would deposit 5% of the purchase price plus survey fees, at the time of sale. Within 40 days he had to pay an additional 20 percent of the purchase money. Additional payments of 25 percent of the purchase price were to be made within two, three, and four years after the date of the sale. For the last three payments he was charged 6 percent interest per year.


 

1803 Louisiana Purchase from France doubled the size of the nation, adding the region drained by the Mississippi River's western tributaries.


 

1812 The General Land Office was created as part of the Treasury Department to handle and dispose of public lands. All the land records were now in one place. The British burned Washington, D.C. during the War of 1812. The General Land Office records were moved to a more fireproof building.

At District Land Offices, tracts of surveyed public lands were sold at auctions to the highest bidder - at or above the minimum price set by Congress. Auctions were held irregularly and sometimes lasted two weeks - if enough prospective bidders attended. After auction, unsold lands were available indefinitely at over-the-counter sales at minimum price.


 

1818 Red River Valley of the North added to the United States by the Convention of 1818, which set the boundary with British Canada between Lake Superior and the Rocky Mountains at the 49th Parallel.


 

1819 Florida acquired by treaty with Spain, redrawing the western border of the Louisiana Purchase.


 

1820 Public land sales boomed. The Act of April 24, 1820, authorized land to be sold for a minimum of $1.25 per acre and tracts as small as 80 acres. Public lands initially offered for sale by District Land Offices were sold at pre-announced, scheduled public auction. If any land remained unsold, the parcels would be available for purchase at the minimum price on a first-come-first-served basis. This replaced the credit system. This act was used the most it gave all of the rights, privileges, immunities, and appurtenances, of whatsoever nature forever.

The President of the United States signed land patents, giving people title to the land. Hundreds, then thousands of Americans gave up their American nationality and chose to go under Mexican rule in order to get land in Texas for growing cotton.


 

1825 The Erie Canal opened. This canal connected the Hudson River in New York with the Great Lakes and provided a water route all the way to Wisconsin. This lured many New Englanders and New Yorkers westward.


 

1845 Texas became a State but did not give unoccupied lands to the United States. There are no Federal public lands in Texas.


 

1846 Oregon Compromise with Great Britain ended joint occupation of the Oregon Country by dividing the region along the 49th Parallel.


 

1848 Discovery of gold in California.
Mexico gave up a vast territory in the Southwest, providing the U.S. with 338 million acres of public lands - now California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, and parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming.


 

1849 U.S. Department of the Interior was formed.


 

1850 The United States purchased 75 million acres of land from Texas, part of what is now Arizona and New Mexico.


 

1853 The United States purchased 19 million acres of land from Mexico with the Gadsden Purchase. This became part of New Mexico and Arizona.


 

1862 Homestead Act. Allowed settlement of public lands and required only residence and improvement and cultivation of the land. Any person, a citizen or person intending to become a citizen, 21 years of age or older, and the head of a household could make application. With five years residence and improvements/cultivation, only a $15.00 fee was required to get 160 acres. Repealed in 1976.


 

1865 Petroleum reported on public lands at the land office for Humboldt, California. The first reservation of petroleum on public land.


 

1866 The Mining Act declared all mineral lands of public domain free and open to exploration and occupancy. The GLO established mineral survey districts. Prospectors could file a claim on mineral vein or load at GLO for $5.00 per acre.


 

1867 Alaska purchased from Russia, adding 365 million acres of public lands to the United States.
 

1870 Placer Mining Act. Permitted survey and sale of placer mining lands for $2.50 per acre.


 

1872 General Mining Law passed. This identified mineral lands as a distinct class of public lands subject to exploration, occupation and purchase under certain conditions.

First National Park established - Yellowstone.


 

1877 Timber Culture Act passed granting tracts of public lands to settlers who planted and cared for trees on the plains. Repealed in 1891.


 

1877 Desert Land Act passed permitting disposal of 640-acre tracts of arid public lands at $1.25 per acre to homesteaders if they proved reclamation of the land by irrigation.


 

1887 General Land Office had 113 district land offices in operation.


 

1890 Peak number of 123 district land offices in operation.


 

1898 Annexation of Hawaiian Islands by the United States. Since Hawaii had been an independent nation, no public lands were involved.

Principal of public land laws extended to the Territory of Alaska.


 

1959 Alaska formally admitted to the Union as the last public land state.
Hawaii formally became the 50th state. Because most of the Hawaiian islands were in private ownership, Hawaii was not a public land State.

 

Follow the paper trail of language for knowledge is wealth.

 

Types of Land Patents

 

Cash Entry: An entry that covered public lands for which the individual paid cash or its equivalent.

 

Credits: These patents were issued to anyone who either paid by cash at the time of sale and received a discount; or paid by credit in installments over a four-year period. If full payment were not received within the four-year period, title to the land would revert back to the Federal Government.

 

Homestead: A Homestead allowed settlers to apply for up to 160 acres of public land if they lived on it for five years and proof of cultivation. This land did not cost anything per acre, but the settler did pay a filing fee.

 

Military Warrants: From 1788 to 1855 the United States granted military bounty land warrants as a reward for military service. These warrants were issued in various denominations and based upon the rank and length of service.

 

Mineral Certificates: The General Mining Law of 1872 defined mineral lands as a parcel of land containing valuable minerals in its soil and rocks. There were three kinds of mining claims:

Lode Claims contained gold, silver or other precious metals occurring in veins;
Placer Claims are for minerals not found in veins; and
Mill Site Claims are limited to lands that do not contain valuable minerals. Up to five acres of public land may be claimed for the purpose of processing minerals.
 

Private Land Claims: A claim based on the assertion that the claimant (or his predecessors in interest) derived his right while the land was under the dominion of a foreign government.

 

Railroad: To aid in the construction of certain railroads. The Act of September 20, 1850, granted to the State alternate sections of public land on either side of the rail lines and branches.

 

State Selection: Each new State admitted to the Union was granted 500,000 acres of public land for internal improvements established under the Act of September 4, 1841.

 

Swamp: Under the Act of September 28, 1850, lands identified as swamp and overflowed lands unfit for cultivation was granted to the States. Once accepted by the State, the Federal Government had no further jurisdiction over the parcels.

 

Town Sites: An area of public lands which has been segregated for disposal as an urban development, often subdivided in blocks, which are further subdivided into town lots.

 

Town Lots: May be regular or irregular in shape and its acreage varies from that of regular subdivisions.

 

Follow the paper trail of language for it can set you free.

 

Let’s recap:


The land within the United States of America came from:

 

Native American Indians, England, France, Spain, Mexico, Russia, Hawaii.

 

The United States acquired the land:

 

From Purchase-Manhattan Island, the Louisiana Purchase, and Alaska etc.

 

From War power like, Hawaii and much of the Native American Indian lands etc.

 

From Treaty, the Revolutionary War with England, The Northwest Territories,

The Guadeloupe Hidalgo etc.

 
The people acquired the land from varies types of Land Patents.

 

     Now you see how the United States of America acquired the land. How the people acquired there Land Patent. Let’s look at the language of two words pertaining to a Land Patent, Treaty and Allodial and their meanings.

 

                    For the meaning of Treaty Blacks Law Dictionary say’s (used in our court system)

 

6th Ed. Pg. 1502. "A compact made between two or more independent nations with a view to the public welfare. Louis Wolf & Co. v. United States, Cust. & Pat.App., 107 F.2d 819, 827; United States v. Belmont, N.Y., 301 U.S. 324, 57 S.Ct. 758, 761, 81 LEd. 1134. An agreement, league, or contract between two or more nations or sovereigns, formally signed by commissioners properly authorized, and solemnly ratified by the several sovereigns or the supreme power of each state. Edye v. Robertson, 112 U.S. 580, 5 S.Ct. 247, 28 LEd. 798; Charlton v. Kelly, 229 U.S. 447, 33 S.Ct. 945, 954, 57 LEd. 1274, 46 L.R.A.,N.S., 397. A treaty is not only a law but also a contract between two nations and must, if possible, be so construed as to give full force and effect to all its parts. United States v. Reid, C.C.A.Or., 73 F.2d 153, 155. The term has a far more restricted meaning under U.S. Constitution than under international law. Weinberger v. Rossi, Dist.Col., 456 U.S. 25, 102 S.Ct. 1510, 1514, 71 L.Ed.2d 715. See also Compact.

 

United States treaties may be made by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. Art. 11, Sec. 2, U.S. Const. States may not enter into treaties (Art. I, Sec. 10, ci, 1), and, once made, shall be binding on the states as the supreme law of the land (Art. VI, ci, 2). See Supremacy clause; Treaty clause."

 

Bouvier’s Dictionary 1856 Edition (Bouvier’s Dictionary was the language usage for the Declaration of Independence) The language of section four shows the supremacy of the Treaty.

 

"TREATY, international law. A treaty is a compact made between two or more independent nations with a view to the public welfare treaties are for a perpetuity, or for a considerable time. Those matters which are accomplished by a single act, and are at once perfected in their execution, are called agreements, conventions and pactions.

 

2. On the part of the United States, treaties are made by the president, by and with the consent of the senate, provided two-thirds of the senators present concur. Const. article 2, s. 2, n. 2.

 

3. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance or confederation; Const. art. 1, s. 10, n. 1; nor shall any state, without the consent of congress, enter into any agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power. Id. art. 1, see. 10, n. 2; 3 Story on the Const. §1395.

 

4. A treaty is declared to be the supreme law of the land, and is therefore obligatory on courts; 1 Cranch, R. 103; 1 Wash. C. C. R. 322 1 Paine, 55; whenever it operates of itself without the aid of a legislative provision; but when the terms of the stipulation import a contract, and either of the parties engages to perform a particular act, the treaty addresses itself to the polit-ical, not the judicial department, and the legislature must execute the contract before it can become a rule of the court. 2 Pet. S. C. Rep. 814. Vide Story on the Constitut. Index, h. t.; Serg. Constit. Law, Index, h. t.; 4 Hall's Law Journal, 461; 6 Wheat. 161: 3 Dall. 199; 1 Kent, Comm. 165, 284.

 

5. Treaties are divided into personal and real. The personal relate exclusively to the persons of the contracting parties, such as family alliances, and treaties guarantying the throne to a particular sovereign and his family. As they relate to the persons they expire of course on the death of the sov-ereign or the extinction of his family. Real treaties relate solely to the subject-matters of the convention, independently of the persons of the contracting parties, and continue to bind the state, although there may be changes in its constitution, or in the persons of its rulers. Vattel, Law of Nat. b. 2, c. 12, 183-197."

 

     For the language within the definition you can see that a Treaty is the supreme law of the land. The language within the Treaty is sovereign and with sovereign language you acquire Allodial. Now lets look at the language of Allodial (Do you see the paper trail).

 

For the meaning of Allodial Blacks Law Dictionary say’s (used in our court system)

 

2nd Ed. Pg. 60, 3rd Ed. Pg. 96, 4th Ed. Pg. 100, 5th Ed. Pg. 70, 6th Ed. Pg. 76.

"Free; not holding of any lord or superior; owned without obligation of vassalage or fealty; the opposite of feudal. Barker v. Dayton, 28 Wis. 384; Wallace v. Harmstad, 44 Pa. 499."

 

7th Ed. Pg.76. "Held in absolute ownership; pertaining to an allodium."

 

8th Ed Pg. 83 "Held in absolute ownership; pertaining to an allodium. Cf. FEUDAL. — Also spelled alodial. The term alodial’ originally had no necessary reference to the mode in which the ownership of land had been conferred; it simply meant land held in absolute ownership, not in dependence upon any other body or person in whom the proprietary rights were supposed to reside, or to whom the possessor of land was bound to render service. It would thus properly apply to the land which in the original settlement had been allotted to individuals, while bookland was primarily applicable to land the title to which rested on a formal grant. Before long, however, the words appear to have been used synonymously to express land held in absolute ownership, the subject of free disposition inter vivos or by will." Kenelm E. Digby, An Introduction to the Histoy of the Law of Real Property 11—12 -5th ed. 1897."

 

Follow the paper trail of language it will give you wisdom.


 

     The word allodium appeared in the definition of the 7th & 8th Editions of Blacks Law.

 

     For the meaning of Allodium Blacks Law Dictionary say’s (used in our court system)

 

2nd Ed Pg. 60, 3rd Ed Pg. 96, 4th Ed Pg. 100, 5th Ed Pg. 70, 6th Ed Pg. 76

Allodium. "Land held absolutely in one’s own right, and not of any lord or superior; land not subject to feudal duties or burdens. An estate held by absolute ownership, Without recognizing any superior to whom any duty is due on account thereof. 1 Washb. Real Prop. 16. McCartee v. Orphan Asylum, 9 Cow., N.Y. 511, 18 Am. Dec. 516."

 

7th Ed pg. 76, 8th Ed Pg. 83 "Allodium (a-lob-dee-am), n. An estate held in fee simple absolute. — Also spelled alodium. —Also termed alod; alode.

‘In this country, one who has full ownership of land is said to own it allodially — that is, free of feudal services and incidents.’ Thomas F. Bergin & Paul 0. Haskell, Preface to Estates in Land and Future Interests 18 (2d ed. 1984)."

 

Bouvier’s Dictionary 1856 Edition (Bouvier’s Dictionary was the language usage for the Declaration of Independence)

 

"Allodium estates. Signifies an absolute estate of inheritance, in coutradistinction to a feud.

2. In this country the title to land is essentially allodial, and every tenant in fee simple has an absolute and perfect title, yet in technical language his estate is called an estate in fee simple, and the tenure free and common socage. 3 Kent, Com. 390; Cruise, Prel. Dis. c. 1, 13; 2 Bl. Com. 45. For the etymology of this word, vide 3 Kent Com. 398 note; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1692."

 

     Now you see the truth of the language a Land Patent is absolute and perfect title the perfection comes with the Treaty. The Treaty is the supreme law of the land and protected by the Constitution, Article six paragraph two and with the support of paragraph three;

 

 "This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding."

"The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States."

The language within the Land Patent speaks for itself and gives you your right, "and assigns forever". Now you see what our founding Fathers gave us absolute control of our self, they call it Sovereign. Now you as a Deed holder can bring your name into your Land Patent and exercise the language within of what your founding Fathers gave you. For that procedure will follow after you see what you have today.

 

Now lets look at what they call Color of Title (Warranty Deed etc.).

 

For the question, what is a Color of Title? Color of Title is fictional characteristic usage of language.

 

For the meaning of Color of Title Blacks Law Dictionary say’s (used in our court system)

 

Blacks Law 2nd Ed Pg. 217, 3rd Ed Pg. 353, 4th Ed Pg. 332, 5th Ed Pg. 214, 6th Ed Pg. 266.

( For the definition below came from the 4th Ed of Blacks Law dictionary it is the most comprehensive definition of all the editions, and it holds the language of the 2nd , 3rd , 5th, 6th Editions within the definition).


 

"COLOR OF TITLE. The appearance, semblance, or simulacrum of title. Also termed "apparent title." Any fact, extraneous to the act or mere will of the claimant, which has the appearance, on its face, of supporting his claim of a present title to land, but which, for some defect, in reality falls short of establishing it. Howth v. Farrar, C.C.A. Tex., 94 F.2d 654, 658; Saltmarsh V. Crommelin, 24 Ala. 352.


 

Anything in writing purporting to convey title to the land, which defines the extent of the claim, it being immaterial how defective or imperfect the writing may be, so that it is a sign, semblance, or color of title. Theisen v. Qualley, 42 S.D. 367, 175 N.W. 556, 557. A title that is imperfect, but not so obviously so that it would be apparent to one not skilled in the law. Ipock V. Gaskins, 161 N.C. 673, 77 SE. 843, 847.

 

A writing upon its face professing to pass title but which does not, either through want of title in the grantor or a defective mode of conveyance. Philbin V. Carr, 75 Ind.App.

560, 129 N.E. 19, 24; Glass v. Lynchburg Shoe Co., 212 N.C. 70, 192 SE. 899.

 

That which the law considers prima facie a good title, but which, by reason of some defect, not appearing on its face, does not In fact amount to title. An absolute nullity, as a void deed, judgment, etc., will not constitute color of title. Causey v. White, 143 Ga. 7, 84 S. E. 58; Stearns Coal & Lumber Co. v. Boyatt. 168 Ky. 111, 181 SW. 962. 964. That which is title in appearance but not in reality. Fitschen Bros. Commercial Co. v. Noyes’ Estate, 76 Mont. 175, 246 p. ‘773, 779; Boland v. Heck, 179 Okl. 403, 65 P.2d 1213, 1215.

 

"Any instrument having a grantor and grantee, and containing a description of the lands intended to be conveyed, and apt words for their conveyance, gives color of title to the lands described. Such an instrument purports to be a conveyance of the title, and because it does not, for some reason, have that effect, it passes only color or the semblance of a title." Brooks v. Bruyn, 35 Ill. 392.

 

"Color of title" is not synonymous with • ‘claim of title." To constitute "color of title" there must be a paper title to give color to the adverse possession, whereas, a "claim of title" may be shown wholly by parol Walton V. Slkes, 165 Ga. 422, 141 S.E. 188, 190."

 

Blacks Law 7th Ed Pg. 260, 8th Ed Pg. 283

"Color of Title. A written instrument or other evidence that appears to give title, but does not do so. — Also termed apparent title."

 

     Now you see from the above definitions, it only appears to give title but in fact only simulates the title. Color of Title is fictional characteristic usage of language. Think about this if you really own your property (vacant Land or with dwelling) why do you have to have permission (permit) to build or remodel on your property and then pay for that permission. Color of Title is nothing but a prestige way of renting.

 

Thomas Jefferson once said:

"That government is best which governs the least, because its people discipline themselves."

"The people of this nation should never fear the government but the government should fear the people."

"Can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath?"

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around [the banks] . . . will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs." -- Thomas Jefferson -- The Debate Over The Recharter Of The Bank Bill, (1809).

Thomas Jefferson’s Prophesy has come true.

         Now for the truth of the language I will outline what you have just read.

 

Our founding Fathers gave their fortunes and lives for our Freedom with Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness with this we acquired our sovereign but our sovereign rest with the land (The paper trail).

  • First the Revolution with England.
  • Then the Treaties that followed (England, Spain, France, Mexico, etc.) with the supremacy of the land.

 

  • Then the various purchases of the land (Spain, France, Mexico, Russia etc.).
  • Then the admission of the states to the union (When the territories where eligible for statehood, the condition for admission to the union was to surrender their land to the United States of America under an Enabling Act).
  • Then the disposal of the land under various Land Patent Acts.
  • Then the people that acquired the land through various Land Patents also acquired sovereign.
  • The Land Patents are absolute title transferring land ownership from a sovereign (the United States of America Government) to a bona fide purchaser. Land Patents are the first records in a chain of title to a piece of the Public Domain. Therefore, they are extremely important in establishing private ownership of land.
     
  • Remember any transaction with the land the Treaty follows. The Treaty was designed whereby the land would be resolved and reserved for the proper possession and individual ownership of the people of the United States of America. Security in land rights was, and is, found within the Treaty.
     
  • Remember the supremacy clause of the Constitution of the United States of America, Article six paragraph two and with the support of paragraph three;
     
  • "This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding."
     
  • "The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States."
     
  • Note: Article six paragraph two and with the support of paragraph three is the hart of the Constitution, getting to know it is to understand it, to understand it is to know what the founding Fathers gave the people, learn what you have and live what they gave.
     
  • The language within the Land Patent speaks for itself with such language you have "and assigns forever". The word assigns means you your deed. The word forever means just that all the language within the Land Patent document is "Forever" making it absolute ownership-Allodial.
     
  • The Act of April 24, 1820 (Allowed direct cash sales of land from the General Land Office to the public for the first time). This act was used the most, it gave "all the rights, privileges, immunities, and appurtenances, of whatsoever nature, thereto belonging, unto the said (Name of person) and his heirs and assigns forever." Remember that if it is written it exist and if it is not written it’s only hear say.
     
  • The founding Fathers secured the rights of the people within the Treaty. The Treaty secures the land. The Land Patent secures the Hold, to the people. The supremacy clause of the Constitution of the United States of America, Article six paragraphs two and with the support of paragraph three secures the sovereign to the people the sovereign secures the self-control to the people a God given right.
     
  • Remember that from the beginning the Land Patents are absolute title transferring land ownership from a sovereign (the United States of America Government) to a bona fide purchaser. Land Patents are the first records in a chain of title to a piece of the Public Domain. Therefore, they are extremely important in establishing private ownership of land. Truthful language,

 
                                       

                                                             For the change within the language

 

Color of Title: For the language usage within Blacks Law 4th Ed Pg. 332 speaks for itself "Any instrument having a grantor and grantee, and containing a description of the lands intended to be conveyed, and apt words for their conveyance, gives color of title to the lands described. Such an instrument purports to be a conveyance of the title, and because it does not, for some reason, have that effect, it passes only color or the semblance of a title."        

 

Lets go one step futher and look at the word semblance but lets look at the language in Webster’s New World College Dictionary 4th Ed Pg. 1303. "1outward form or appearance; aspect 2 seeming likeness; resemblance 3 a likeness, image, or representation 4 false, assumed, or deceiving form or appearance 5 mere empty show; pretence-SYN, APPEARANCE". As you can see Color of Title is fictional characteristic usage of language.

 

With such title you also acquire a title insurance policy which only insures the fictional characteristic of the paper title and has nothing to do with the land title and I repeat myself the Land Patents are the first records in a chain of title to a piece of the Public Domain. Therefore, they are extremely important in establishing private ownership of land they are "absolute and perfect title".

   

 For the procedure to acquire your name into a Land Patent you must take your name out of Color of Title (fictional characteristic usage of language) and bring it into the proper perspective of the Land Patent (the truth of the language) such a procedure can be acquired with complete forms and instructions for a gift of $29.95 may be sent to R. J. Elsarelli at P.O. Box 701 Munising, Michigan 49862 with notification to LandPatentLaw@hotmail.com allow seven to ten days by mail or use the credit card system.

 

 

 

Thomas Jefferson once said.

"Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today."

 


 



 

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